Child Poverty Statistics show poverty falling (and rising)

Child Poverty Statistics show poverty falling (and rising)

The HBAI statistics published last week show a confusing picture: child poverty levels have been falling (see below).

However, this is partly because poverty is generally measured as income below 60% of median income, and that median income has been falling in recent years (see below).

That is one reason that Ian Duncan Smith is right to want to change the way poverty is measured (though less right in the way he wants to change the measure to).  When measured against 2010/11 incomes levels, child poverty has begun to rise (see below).

Notably, in both measures of child poverty, the North East is no longer the region with the highest level outside of London.  And we are the only region with a Child Poverty Commission.    Can't be coincidence, surely?

More of this jiggery-pokery in the update to the baseline on Child Poverty in the North East, due to be published this autumn.

Employers

Work has to be a better route out of poverty. Most poor children have a working parent.

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Schools

Poverty leads to poor attainment.  Poor attainment leads to poverty.

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Local Authorities

Councils have a duty to address child poverty through their services, jobs and contracts.

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Everyone

Everyone can help to tackle child poverty. Every contribution matters.

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