Good Jobs

Good Jobs

For those who are able to work, work has to be seen as the best route out of poverty.
Iain Duncan Smith

A job should be a way out of poverty, but for many it is not.  While inevitably some roles will be paid less than others, and entry-level jobs requiring few skills are important, if work is to be a route out of poverty it is essential that people can progress from these roles.  This means that all jobs should be 'good jobs', with reliable hours, opportunities for training and chances to progress - to work their way out of poverty.

Employees who have 'good jobs' are able to manage their family income better, and move up the ladder to more secure, rewarding roles.  Employers who provide 'good jobs' see higher productivity, better staff retention and reduced absenteeism.

We recognise that market pressures can make it hard for businesses to always offer 'good jobs', but there is lots of support from the Government, the Local Enterprise Partnerships and others to help and encourage training, apprenticeships, and wider business development.  Useful sources of support include:

Employers

Work has to be a better route out of poverty. Most poor children have a working parent.

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Schools

Poverty leads to poor attainment.  Poor attainment leads to poverty.

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Local Authorities

Councils have a duty to address child poverty through their services, jobs and contracts.

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Everyone

Everyone can help to tackle child poverty. Every contribution matters.

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